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This year at the North American Junior/Young Rider Championships, Canadian rider David Ziegler made history by winning a gold medal in eventing and a silver medal in dressage, but he couldn’t have done it without the help of Pennsylvania trainers Jessica and Missy Ransehousen.

 

At the suggestion of a friend, Ziegler took a lesson with Missy Ransehousen. Impressed with the way his horse responded to her training, he moved to Ransehousen’s Blue Hill Farm in Unionville, PA to continue working with her.

 

Unfortunately, Ziegler’s mount, Topper, had taken a dislike to the sport of eventing, but luckily Missy’s mother – esteemed dressage judge and rider Jessica Ransehousen – was on site to help develop Topper’s dressage skills.  Ziegler also began riding Missy’s event horse Critical Decision, and started training for the 2014 NAJYRC.

 

Both Critical Decision and Topper performed wonderfully for Ziegler at NAJYRC, earning him a gold medal in the eventing competition and a silver medal in dressage. Ziegler’s sights are now set on Dressage at Devon, where he will be competing Topper this fall with the help of coach Jessica Ransehousen. We wish him the best of luck in Pennsylvania! 

Pa Horse Property

Native plants and animals can be a great help to your PA horse property, from helping to minimize mud to reducing pests and parasites. Take a look at a few of the ways that organisms naturally found in your area can improve your property: Native plants and trees can help reduce mud by absorbing water in the soil. Trees like Douglas firs, willows, and dogwoods love water, and can help dry wet areas or prevent excess runoff. Well-placed native trees can also provide shade for your animals, and plants will help keep topsoil in place and prevent erosion. The animals found in Eastern PA can also be a huge help to you – most specifically, local birds and bats. Birds like the ubiquitous barn swallow and Eastern bluebird eat a LOT of insects, and can significantly reduce the parasite population on your farm. Encourage these feathered friends by providing nesting boxes and leaving horse hair from your grooming sessions on the ground for the birds to use as nest-making material. Bats can also be a huge help in keeping the insect population on your PA horse property at a manageable level. These helpful creatures can also be encouraged to call your farm home by putting up a bat house, but it can take a bit longer for a group of bats to move in. Once you do have a group of bats on your PA horse farm, they will quickly devour every mosquito they can find. Encouraging the growth of native plants and animals not only helps preserve the natural ecosystem around you, but can also vastly improve the health of your land. Consult a local expert to see which species will fit in best on your PA horse farm.

 

 

This beautiful boarding barn in Honey Brook, PA is under new management, and stalls are now available for new boarders, with the option of full or self care.  

 

Your horse or pony will be comfortable in one of 15 12’x12’ stalls, with turnout in one of many fenced pastures. The farm has both an indoor and an outdoor riding arena, and a heated tackroom and bathroom for boarders’ comfort. There is plenty of parking on site as well.

 

This family-friendly facility even offers child care for busy parents while they are on the property riding or caring for their horses, and is working towards being able to provide riding lessons and time hanging out with ponies for special needs children.

 

Self-care board starts at $250, and Full care at $600. Opportunities to work off board are available.

 

The farm is located at 436 Churchtown Rd, Honey Brook, PA 19344.

 

For more information or to schedule a tour of the barn, please call Ronda: 610-547-6860

 

 

Native plants and animals can be a great help to your PA horse property, from helping to minimize mud to reducing pests and parasites. Take a look at a few of the ways that organisms naturally found in your area can improve your property:

 

Native plants and trees can help reduce mud by absorbing water in the soil. Trees like Douglas firs, willows, and dogwoods love water, and can help dry wet areas or prevent excess runoff. Well-placed native trees can also provide shade for your animals, and plants will help keep topsoil in place and prevent erosion.

 

The animals found in Eastern PA can also be a huge help to you – most specifically, local birds and bats. Birds like the ubiquitous barn swallow and Eastern bluebird eat a LOT of insects, and can significantly reduce the parasite population on your farm. Encourage these feathered friends by providing nesting boxes and leaving horse hair from your grooming sessions on the ground for the birds to use as nest-making material.

 

Bats can also be a huge help in keeping the insect population on your PA horse farm at a manageable level. These helpful creatures can also be encouraged to call your farm home by putting up a bat house, but it can take a bit longer for a group of bats to move in. Once you do have a group of bats on your PA horse farm, they will quickly devour every mosquito they can find.

 

Encouraging the growth of native plants and animals not only helps preserve the natural ecosystem around you, but can also vastly improve the health of your land. Consult a local expert to see which species will fit in best on your PA horse farm. 


 

 

Bucks County, PA is a great place to open a boarding barn. With its rural location, beautiful countryside, easy access to trails and horse shows, and large equestrian community, Bucks County can be an ideal location for a boarding facility. The team at CSEP can help you find the perfect farm, but once you’ve bought it, how do you go about deciding how much to charge your new boarders?

 

It all starts with calculating your expenses. Once you figure out how much it will cost you to maintain your farm and care for the horses on your property, you can decide on a board rate that will allow you to at least break even, and hopefully make a good profit.

 

Some of the largest costs you’ll have to consider are rent or mortgage payments and insurance, which represent a big chunk of your overhead. Utility costs should also be taken into consideration.

 

When it comes to caring for horses on your Bucks County horse property, feeding them will undoubtedly be your biggest expense. What are the going prices for hay and grain in your area? The average horse will eat about half of a square bale of hay a day, so you can estimate how much you’ll need to spend in feed each month. Stable supplies, bedding, farm help, and the cost of inevitably repairing fences and buildings should also factor into your estimated costs.

 

Once you’ve done the math, deciding on a board rate is a simple matter of ensuring that your boarders are paying you more than you’re spending.

 

 

We’ve had a classic, hot, humid Eastern PA summer this year, and many riders choose to supplement their horses’ diets with extra electrolytes to replace the minerals lost in sweat. But there are lots of supplements on the market, and no hard-and-fast rule as to when a horse really needs electrolyte supplementation. So, does your horse need electrolytes?

 

According to the veterinarians interviewed in this article: http://www.equisearch.com/article/when-your-horse-needs-electrolytes The average pleasure or show horse doesn’t need a daily electrolyte supplement, despite what manufacturers and current feeding trends may have you believe. Horses can replace what electrolytes are lost during normal sweating by eating hay, drinking water, and having access to a salt block. Supplementing a horse that isn’t sweating excessively with electrolytes is simply a waste of money – the horse will urinate out all of the extra minerals.

 

However, horses that sweat excessively for a prolonged period of time can benefit from electrolyte supplementation. For example, trail horses who are ridden for hours at a stretch in hot, humid conditions, endurance horses, and horses being shipped long distances in the summer heat are all at risk of losing significant amounts of electrolytes through sweat. Horses like these that are producing a lot of sweat can benefit from a powdered, pelleted, paste, or liquid electrolyte supplement to help replace the necessary minerals.

 

So before you go adding electrolytes to your horse’s feed, take a good look at how much they’re sweating to determine if your horse really needs them!

 

 

Every Saturday afternoon throughout the summer, Memorytown USA in Mount Pocono, PA hosts the Pocono Rodeo. A fun-filled day for kids and adults alike, the Rodeo has something for everyone. Starting at 2pm each Saturday afternoon, enjoy live music, delicious BBQ, and kids’ activities like pony rides, a petting zoo, and fishing.

 
At 6pm the excitement begins, and rodeo competitors saddle up to see who is the toughest, fastest rider. Cowboys and cowgirls compete in bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, barrel racing, and team roping.


After you’ve watched the best of the best ride their way to victory, enjoy the rodeo after-party at 8pm, complete with bar, live music, and dancing.
 

The Pocono Rodeo is also affordable fun – it’s right here in Eastern PA, and tickets are only $18 for adults, and $12 for children. Come celebrate a little bit of the west right here in Pennsylvania! To purchase tickets or find out more about the Pocono Rodeo, visit the website: http://www.poconorodeo.com or call: 570.839.1680.

July 7-11, 2014 is National Farriers Week. Take the opportunity to say “thanks” for all of the great work your farrier does for your horse. The next time your farrier comes to work on your PA horse farm,consider greeting him or her with a nice cold drink, cup of coffee, or giftcard for gas. For professionals who work hard traveling and standing on their feet all day, gestures like these can really brighten their day! And you know what they say – no foot, no horse. Thank you, PA farriers, for all of your hard work!

Long Pond, Tunkhannock Township  -  Announcing a rent/lease on horse property  a 1,980 sq. ft., 2 bath, 3 bdrm 2 story. Now $1,200.00 Monthly +.$300 for full care stall

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In our beautiful state, we can get quite a bit of rain! While rain may put a damper on your riding plans, it can also save you money and help the environment by making your PA horse farm a much ‘greener’ place. Using rainwater to water your garden, wash your horses, or give your livestock a drink can save gallons of tap water!

 

Harvesting rainwater can be as simple as setting up your gutters to drain into a barrel. A good rain barrel is opaque and has a tight-fitting top and screened pipes to avoid the growth of parasitic larvae like mosquitoes. Once the water is collected in the barrel, it can be used for just about anything you can think of, though water should be filtered and sanitized before horses or humans take a drink.

 

Sophisticated systems are also available, and you can outfit your PA horse farm with a rainwater harvesting system for anywhere from $1,500 for a simple set-up, to $20,000 for a complex one with filters and a UV sterilizer. These systems can completely replace a well or municipal water line.

 

Whatever method you choose, using rainwater instead of tap water can make a big dent in your water and electric bills, and makes your PA horse farm environmentally friendly. If you’re interested in collecting rain on your PA horse property, contact a local contractor to learn about your options.

•  lot / land - $345,000

 -  42 ACRES of Farmland and Woodland with stream, drive thru corn crib, and dual loft storage building. Chose your homesite overlooking the babbling stream or tucked in the woods viewing your livestock and/or crops. Conveniently located to PA Turnpike and just north of Beltzville Lake for boating, swimming, fishing and hiking. Also in the midst of all the Pocono activities - water and snow skiing, whitewater rafting, water parks and casinos. In Clean & Green - Act 319 and part of 148 acre Otto Farm

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Riding and training clinics are great ways to learn new techniques, improve your skills, and meet other like-minded equestrians. Hosting a clinic at your own PA horse property can be a fun, rewarding, and educational experience. Here’s a list of considerations to take to mind when planning your own equestrian clinic:


-Be sure you have the space! You’ll need plenty of parking, both for cars and trailers, if participants from other stables are going to take part in your clinic. Spare stalls for horses that are being shipped in for the event are also important.

-Your riding arena should be able to accommodate the type of training being done at the clinic. If you’re offering a jumping clinic, be sure you have a space with appropriate footing and several jumps. A groundwork clinic might require a round pen. If lessons are given to groups, be sure your arena is big enough for several riders to work in at once. Talk with your selected clinician to make sure your PA horse farm is an appropriate location.

-Check with your insurance provider to make sure you have the right coverage to protect you when hosting an event that will bring in riders and horses from other farms.

-Get the word out! Advertise in local tack shops, feed stores, and online. Facebook groups are fast becoming a great way to let others know about equestrian events in your area.

 

Hosting a clinic is also a creative way to show off your PA horse property to potential buyers – you never know who might be in the market!

Sold

Bath, Moore Township  -  We sold this property for $41,000 over list price plus the buyer paid the seller's real estate transfer tax and the buyers agent broker fee so it really sold for $67,000 over listing price.  We had competing offers - list with us - we will get your farm sold.

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equestrian arena

A riding arena is the finishing touch for a PA horse property, but installing one takes more than just fencing off a rectangular area and dumping sand on top. Proper materials and construction must come together to create an arena with good footing that will last for the long haul. Here are some tips from TheHorse.com on some common arena construction mistakes:

 

1.     Using The Wrong Type of Base Layer – Once you’ve excavated an area for your ring, a base layer of stone needs to go down to ensure a solid surface that drains well. Often people will use stone that is too soft, the wrong shape, or they simply won’t put down enough. Be sure to consult with a contractor experienced in installing arenas in your particular geographic area.

2.     Neglecting to Install Adequate Drainage – At least one drain running across the length of the arena and one drain around the perimeter should be installed. This will keep the footing from getting waterlogged during heavy rains, and make your ring useable in all types of weather.

3.    Installing Weak Fence Posts – Fencing around an arena takes more abuse than most, and posts need to be sturdy enough to handle it.

4.     Building at the Wrong Time of Year – Arenas, especially in areas like Eastern PA where clay soil is common, should be built during a dry time to avoid the ground shifting or changing shape.

 

For more details on the right steps to take when installing an arena on your horse farm in Pennsylvania, check out the full article from TheHorse.comhttp://www.thehorse.com/articles/33991/avoid-common-mistakes-when-building-an-outdoor-arena?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=lameness&utm_campaign=06-11-2014

 

Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.

Welcome to Wilson Stables

• 1,980 sq. ft., 2 bath, 3 bdrm 2 story - $299,000

 -  Delightful horse property on 9.6 acres offers 2 exceptionally well maintained homes with central air, 46x48 pole barn built 7+ years ago with 10x12 matted stalls, feed room & tack area. Ideal pancake flat acreage which has been cleared for ample turn-out areas. 80x100 riding ring with wood fence. 4 paddocks plus large run-in shed. Adorable barn for mini-horses or goats. Shed for hay. Borders Bethlehem water shed for miles and miles of trails. Main home features 3 bedrooms with one on the 1st floor (currently used as sitting room), office, stone fireplace with wood stove insert, new carpeting in living room, laundry room and oversized attached garage and car port. Patio and dog pen. Nice 700+ square foot 2 bedroom guest house offers arched ceilings, cheery sunroom, jacuzzi tub & full basement. Landscaped with Gazebo. Separate septics & electric, shared well.

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